Bluebell fun facts

Bluebell fun facts

For those of us lucky enough to live within a walk of long-established woodland, we can still enjoy bluebells despite the lockdown. Beckenham Place Park is one such area, although get ready to exercise emergency social distancing manoeuvres as oblivious joggers jag around, their ears full of choons. Oxleas Woods off Shooters Hill is another and I daresay Sydenham Hill Woods have their share. After that I think we’re talking Petts Wood and the adjoining Hawkwood and Little Heath Wood and Selsdon Wood south-west of Croydon. Of course, there are brilliant bluebells at Downe, Meenfield Wood, Ide Hill, One Tree Hill, Hosey Common and in woods east of Shoreham on this website’s walks, but we can’t get there at the moment and the flowers don’t last much beyond the end of the month so I reckon this year is kaput for the cobalt carpet. Anyway, some bluebell factoids gleaned from an excellent article with far more detail called Bloomageddon: seven clever ways bluebells win the woodland turf war at The Conversation website.

  • They are uniquely adapted to suited the multispecies ancient woodlands of the UK
  • Low temperatures trigger their growth. Bluebell seeds germinate when the temperature drops below 10°C.
  • Bluebells predominantly convert sunlight into fructose allowing them to photosynthesise at low temperatures.
  • They are supreme competitors with other plants, allowing them to carpet woodland floors. But they get help in the form of mycorrhiza, a symbiotic fungi.
  • Almost half the world’s bluebells are found in the UK, they’re relatively rare in the rest of the world.

But please be careful never to tread on any; it takes bluebells years to recover from foot damage.

Beckenham Place Park ‘reopens’ – and looks great

Beckenham Place Park ‘reopens’ – and looks great

This Saturday (20 July) is the official opening of Beckenham Place Park, south-east London’s largest green space (well, before you get to Petts Wood). There’s a fantastic new 283-metre-long lake fed by water from an aquifer 50-odd metres down via a bore hole, which will be available for open-air swimming, canoeing and paddleboarding (swimming will be £3 per session). Aquatic plants around the lake should help to absorb nutrients, thus purifying the water, and oxygen pumps will help keep it clear of unwanted weeds and algae. A family of egyptian geese and another of mallards has already moved in and egrets have been spotted stalking around. Still loads of bloody noisy parakeets though.

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It all looks fantastic, in an area lacking open air swimming facilities since the 1980s but, slightly worryingly, some people have jumped the gun and each evening push aside the barriers to take to the waters. Dogs are another issue with owners allowing their pooches to enter the water – this will not be permitted after the opening, which is good, much as I love dogs.

I’ve walked around lots lately and loved the feel of the place in Friday evening’s drizzle and low cloud. It was quiet, the meadows were gorgeous under the grey sky and there weren’t many in the delightful little bar that’s popped up in the mansion.

Triathlons will be held in the park from autumn onwards. A concert featuring Neneh Cherry and a host of DJs and pretty cool nu-jazz acts will take place in the park on 27 July, tickets (£45 adults) here.

Read more about it in my article for the Guardian Travel website